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Reading

~Chinese / 中文
《平如美棠》饶平如

~Japanese / 日本語
「女のいない男たち」村上春樹
「職業は武装解除」瀬谷ルミ子

~English
"Notes on Democracy" Arundhati Roy

~Korean / 한국어
《그렇습니까? 기린입니다》박민규
《소나기》 황순원

~Finished / 読了 / 已读
「コンビニ人間」村田沙耶香
"Factory Girls" Lesley Chang
"Your Republic is Calling You" Kim Young-ha
「色彩を持たない多崎つくると彼の巡礼の年」村上春樹
《裸命》陈冠中
"River Town" Peter Hessler
"Oracle Bones" Peter Hessler
"Country Driving" Peter Hessler
「カンガルー日和」村上春樹
「こころ」夏目漱石
「火の鳥9」 手塚治虫
《呐喊》鲁迅
《娃》莫言
《朋友》余华
"Inside the Kingdom" Robert Lacey
《活着》余华
"A Room of One's Own" Virginia Woolf
「羊をめぐる冒険」村上春樹
《阿Q正传》鲁迅
《倾城之恋 》张爱玲
《茉莉香片》张爱玲
《金锁记》张爱玲
「深夜特急」(2)沢木耕太郎
「1973年のピンボール」 村上春樹
"One Foot In Eden" Ron Rash
「双子の星」宮沢賢治

Murakami Haruki’s New Novel Due Feb 2017 – Here’s how to get updates 

Publisher Shinchōsha has announced Murakami Haruki is going to publish a new novel in Feb 2017.

Promotional image from Shinchōsha’s website

 

The image says:

Murakami Haruki

First super-long novel in 7 years

 Publication set for Feb 2017

2,000 pages completed, 2 volumes total

He said it’s going to be “a very strange story, longer than Kafka On the Shore, and shorter than 1Q84.” Those novels sold more than 4 million & 8.4 million copies, respectively. (Source: Asahi Shimbun)

It’s been almost 4 years since his last novel was published, in 2013. That was Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

He published the short story collection Men Without Women in 2014.

Want ongoing updates (in Japanese)?

Below I explain how to subscribe to email updates from the publisher  about the novel.

– Go to the Shinchōsha website.


– Click the black button, or this link. It says, “Those seeking forthcoming information, [click] here.”


– Fill in your email in both boxes.

– Click the black button. It says “Send.”

That’s it!

I’ll aim to publish the updates here as they come out.

 

Other sources:

The Hindu

Murakami Haruki’s new book: “The Men Without Women”  

World-renowned Japanese writer Murakami Haruki has a new book out, his first collection of short stories in nine years. The title is「女のいない男たち」or The Men Without Women, and it includes six new stories, all of which were first published in the last six months.

Last month I got my preordered copy of The Men Without Women (Japanese: Onna no inai otoko tachi) at Kinokuniya New York. It’s available for purchase online here for $24.50.

While Murakami’s novels are always published in English within a year or so of their initial publication (the next one, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, will come out this year), his short story collections are not usually published in English. That is, the publishers usually make their own collections, such as in the case of The Elephant Vanishes (17 stories spanning the 1980s, and published 12 years later in Japanese as「象の消滅」). The Chinese publishers seem to do the same thing. The difference is that the Chinese publishers will take a well-known story, make it the title of a collection, and publish it with a bunch of lesser-known stories. The English-language publishers seem to publish fewer, larger collections and simply don’t bother to translate and print the lesser-known stories. Thus, I surmise that this book may never come out in English as The Men Without Women. Fans who don’t read Japanese will have to wait for the next short story collection.

As for the title, I translate it as The Men Without Women rather than Men Without Women (or Men Whose Women Are Gone, etc.) because otoko tachi (rather than simply otoko) seems to refer to specific men. Indeed, in each of these six stories, the protagonist is a man without a woman. However, it is probably not a coincidence that Ernest Hemingway published a collection of ten short stories about men in 1927, called Men Without Women, and the name of that book in Japanese translation is—you guessed it—Onna no inai otoko tachi. It was translated by Ayukawa Nobuo in 1982, just when Murakami was beginning his writing career.

The Japanese Wikipedia page includes some trivia about the new book. Apparently, it is usual that it does not include a preface. The two stories “Drive My Car” and “Yesterday” were supposedly altered somehow before publication in the book, and “Drive My Car” has already been translated and published in Korean by Yang Eog-gwan (梁億寬).

Edit: The story “Sheherazade” was published in the Oct. 13 issue of The New Yorker and translated by Ted Gossen, a professor at York University in Toronto.

Below are the front and back covers of the book, with English translations of the story titles, descriptions, and dates/places of publication. All translations are mine, and thus later publications may make different choices.

 

Front cover

Onna no inai otoko tachi - Murakami Haruki (Copyright 2014)

Onna no inai otoko tachi – Murakami Haruki (Copyright 2014)

 

「女のいない男たち」

The Men Without Women

First issue April 20th, 2014

 

Murakami Haruki,

[His] short story world for the first time in nine years.

That story is

Deeper, sharper,

And exceeds expectations.

 

Bungei Shunju publication / Fixed price (JPY 1574 + tax)

 

Back cover

Onna no inai otoko tachi (Back cover) - Murakami Haruki (Copyright 2014)

Onna no inai otoko tachi (Back cover) – Murakami Haruki (Copyright 2014)

 

Six stories that intertwine and echo.

 

“Drive My Car”

Bungei Shunju Dec. 2013

Stage actor Kafuku hires Misaki, a female driver. Why did his deceased wife have to have a relationship with that man? Little by little, he began to tell Misaki.

 

“Yesterday”

Bungei Shunju Jan. 2014

What is the strange “cultural exchange” proposed by his classmate Kitaru, from Den-en-chōfu but who can speak perfect Kansai dialect? And then, 16 years passed.

 

“Independent Organ”

Bungei Shunju Mar. 2014

What did his friend, the confirmed bachelor Dr. Tokai, obtain for the first time by sacrificing his life?

 

“Scheherazade”

MONKEY Vol. 2 Spring 2014

Shut up in the “house” that is a lonely island on land, Habara is toyed with by the story that even the world finds captivating, told by the “contact person” woman after the affair.

 

“Kino”

Bungei Shunju Feb. 2014

Betrayed by his wife, Kino quit his job and opened a bar. Then at certain times, a strange presence would envelop the place.

 

“The Men Without Women”

First published here

One night after midnight, a phone call from his former lover’s husband came to deliver sad news.

Onna no inai otoko tachi - Murakami Haruki (Copyright 2014)

Onna no inai otoko tachi – Murakami Haruki (Copyright 2014)

Four Famous Foods in Fukuoka

In August 2012 I returned to Fukuoka for the first time. In 2009-2010 I studied at Kyushu University as an exchange student, where I studied Japanese culture and linguistics and learned Japanese.

My return was part of a five-week trip from Tokyo to Shanghai via Nagasaki by boat. I spent about five days in Fukuoka meeting old friends, teachers, and my host family. (I also wrote a post about the temple of the Great Buddha.)

Today I want to share four of the most delicious things I ate in Fukuoka. Can you guess what they are?

4. Fugu bibimba

The Fukuoka Fuku Festival was all about showing off the versatility of fugu, a delicious poisonous pufferfish. I didn’t find fugu sashimi very flavorful, but I once bought a bit and fried it with excellent results. At the festival was a very popular stall selling fugu bibimba (a Korean rice bowl) for 500 yen (~$6).

3. Tonkatsu, or pork cutlet

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My friends recommended this place that serves tonkatsu, Japanese pork cutlet, among many other washoku, or Japanese-style, foods.

2. Tofu hamburger

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A tofu specialty restaurant was a favorite and a recommendation of my host mother’s. She took a friend and me to eat there. The decor was very “Japanese” to our eyes, and the many variations on tofu were amusing and creative, like tofu croquette and tofu hamburger. I went for the latter, with no regrets. It came with steamed vegetables in a wooden box.

Now anyone familiar with me or Fukuoka will certainly guess what tops my list. The historic neighborhood in downtown Fukuoka known as Hakata is practically synonymous with Hakata ramen, a tasty noodle soup made a broth brewed from pork bones. Japan is home to many good ramens, and tonkotsu is king and queen of them all. (Am I biased?) I was overjoyed when Ippudō, Fukuoka’s best known chain, with branches in Hong Kong, New York, etc., opened a branch in Shanghai. Feast your eyes on Hakata ramen!

1. Hakata ramen at Ippudō

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Have you eaten any of these foods? Please comment on your favorite Japanese foods!

Tokyo in the Snow

In January, I posted on this blog about returning from Tokyo to Atlanta via Seattle 110 years after the writer Nagai Kafu made his transpacific journey. I also posted photos from Ishioka, Tsuchiura, and Kasumi-ga-ura, places I reached by hitchhiking down Highway 6 to Tokyo.

My reasons for visiting Tokyo were two. One was to catch my flight from Narita airport back to the USA, since I had booked a round-trop flight to Tokyo in July. I first traveled to Japan and went to Shanghai to study at Fudan University via boat from Nagasaki. My second reason was to attend a conference connected with the research of Dr. Haneda Masashi, a professor and Vice President of the University of Tokyo with whom I had the pleasure to be acquainted in Shanghai, at a conference at Fudan. Dr. Haneda is deeply involved in a project to rewrite world history in a way that reflects the discoveries of science and diminishes the influence of the concept of “nations” and “nationality.” The conference was called “Southern Barbarians, Redheads, and Chinamen: Conflict and Trade in the East Asian Seas” (J: 国際シンポジウム「南蛮・紅毛・唐人―東アジア海域の交易と紛争」) and was held at the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia at the University of Tokyo. Thanks to the generosity of Dr. Haneda, I was granted the important opportunity to attend this conference (conducted 90% in Japanese) and witness the proceedings of an academic conference in Japan for the first time. More about the conference later.

While in Tokyo, I met with many friends, but unfortunately caught a bacterial intestinal infection (again, as I mentioned last year in July when I got sick in Yokohama). I made up my mind the next morning to go for a doctor, and when I stepped outside, I found the world covered in snow.

The photos below were taken outside my hotel (the first three), on the University of Tokyo campus (the fourth), and on the train to Narita Airport.

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The Fukuoka Fuku Festival

In August last year, I returned to Fukuoka, Japan. I was an exchange student at Kyushu University in Fukuoka during my second year of university, in 2009 and ’10. My late summer visit in 2012 was the first time I had returned to Fukuoka. Many friends were still in school, and I made new friends in an old city.

My friend Kaya and I spent an evening at Hakata Pier (Hakata Futoh), where many people were dancing as part of the Fukuoka Fuku Festival. The name is a play on words, as fuku means ‘happiness’ and fugu is everyone’s favorite (eminently edible) poisonous pufferfish. Showcasing the culinary versatility of fugu through food stands was the theme of the night, along with dancing and fireworks.

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Kiyomizu-dera in Pictures

In August last year I visited Kiyomizu Temple in Kyoto, called Kiyomizu-dera in Japanese. The present structures on the Buddhist temple site date from 1633, according to Wikipedia. Hundreds of little bells were hanging in the eaves and chimed in the late summer afternoon breeze.

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Seattle, 110 Years After Kafu

It’s almost the New Year in China. On February 10, the world will enter the Year of the Snake. It’s thus spring break in China, so I came trough Japan and arrived in Seattle today where I will transfer to Atlanta.

The writer Nagai Kafū studied abroad in Shanghai and arrived in Tacoma by boat from Shanghai in 1903. In 1908 he published his Amerika monogatari, or American Stories. It seems he encountered brazen racism in American and didn’t altogether enjoy his time here, though he liked the theatre in New York. Did you know a Japanese writer wrote stories about America in 1908?

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Kieran Maynard

Kieran Maynard

Writer, translator, researcher, traveler specializing in Japanese and Chinese literature.

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